The Three True Interview Questions

Good, interesting post by George Bradt at Forbes, who argues that all interview exchanges answer one of three questions:

The only three true job interview questions are:

1.  Can you do the job? [Strengths]
2.  Will you love the job? [Motivation]
3.  Can we tolerate working with you? [Fit]

…every question, however it is phrased, is just a variation on one of these topics: Strengths, Motivation, and Fit.

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: Symmetry Capital Management, LLC (SCM) is a Pennsylvania registered investment advisor that offers discretionary investment management to individuals and institutions. SCM is not affiliated with or related to Symmetry Partners, LLC. This publication is for informational, educational, and entertainment purposes only. It is not an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy securities, or to engage in any investment strategy. Past performance is not indicative of future results. This material does not take into account your personal investment objectives, your personal financial situation and needs, or your personal tolerance for risk. Thus, any investment strategies or securities discussed may not be suitable for you. You should be aware of the real risk of loss that accompanies any investment strategy or security. It is strongly recommended that you consider seeking advice from your own investment advisor(s) when considering any particular strategy or investment.  We do not guarantee any specific outcome or profit from any strategy or security discussed herein. The opinions expressed are based on information believed to be reliable, but SCM does not warrant its completeness or accuracy, and you should not rely on it as such. All views and positions are subject to change without notice.

The UK Has Run Out of Money

File under preposterous utterances—UK Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, believes his government, the monopoly producer of Great British Pounds, which are essentially created out of thin air, has somehow managed to run out of them (hat tip to Warren Mosler). According to UK newspaper The Telegraph (emphasis added, bold):

The Government ‘has run out of money’ and cannot afford debt-fuelled tax cuts or extra spending, George Osborne has admitted.

In a stark warning ahead of next month’s Budget, the Chancellor said there was little the Coalition could do to stimulate the economy.

Mr Osborne made it clear that due to the parlous state of the public finances the best hope for economic growth was to encourage businesses to flourish and hire more workers.

“The British Government has run out of money because all the money was spent in the good years,” the Chancellor said. “The money and the investment and the jobs need to come from the private sector.”

This statement is so astoundingly wrong that a well-informed and daring-enough media outlet should be able to quickly rip it to shreds, along with Osborne’s credibility. Unfortunately, most of the media is just as ill-informed on the subject as he is, as evidenced by the use of ”admitted” in the quote above, as well as the following poll question which excluded any choice that reflects the actual realities of Britain’s fiscal and monetary operations (e.g., ”The UK government cannot run out of the money that is is the monopoly and near-zero cost supplier of”).

What should George Osborne do to provide a tax cut?

Tax the rich more to allow the income tax rate to be lifted to £10,000

Borrow more and worry about reducing national debt in future years

We can’t afford any tax cuts 

Meanwhile, the latest economic data out of the UK have been welcomed with subtitles like:

“Least downbeat outlook since April 2010″ for household finances, even though the Index has remained stuck between the low 30’s and low 40’s since the global recession ended (a positive outlook has a value of more than 50).

Business Expectations Index recorded single biggest monthly rise in survey history,” while the level remains rangebound about 10% below its level of the prior decade.

Meanwhile, the UK labor market continues to look stagnant despite a slight improvement in January, remaining at the lower end of a decline that began around the same time as the passage of concerted austerity measures (fortunately, at least one UK media outlet has been able to discern that connection).

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES: Symmetry Capital Management, LLC (SCM) is a Pennsylvania registered investment advisor that offers discretionary investment management to individuals and institutions. SCM is not affiliated with or related to Symmetry Partners, LLC. This publication is for informational, educational, and entertainment purposes only. It is not an offer to sell or a solicitation to buy securities, or to engage in any investment strategy. Past performance is not indicative of future results. This material does not take into account your personal investment objectives, your personal financial situation and needs, or your personal tolerance for risk. Thus, any investment strategies or securities discussed may not be suitable for you. You should be aware of the real risk of loss that accompanies any investment strategy or security. It is strongly recommended that you consider seeking advice from your own investment advisor(s) when considering any particular strategy or investment.  We do not guarantee any specific outcome or profit from any strategy or security discussed herein. The opinions expressed are based on information believed to be reliable, but SCM does not warrant its completeness or accuracy, and you should not rely on it as such. All views and positions are subject to change without notice.